Water activities

Rouge National Urban Park

CAUTION: Swimming at Rouge Beach is strongly discouraged until lifeguard services can be restored. Storms may cause erosion and riptides. Water quality is not tested daily and E. Coli levels may be variable, particularly at the river outflow. Park visitors engage in activities at the beach and marsh at their own risk.

Swimming 

Swimming at Rouge Beach is strongly discouraged until lifeguard services can be restored. Storms may cause erosion and riptides. Water quality is not tested daily and E. Coli levels may be variable, particularly at the river outflow. Visitors who choose to swim do so at their own risk.

Parks Canada and the City of Toronto are working together to restore a supervised swim program with lifeguards at Rouge Beach, although further site remediation work is required before a reopening date can be confirmed. There are a number of technical issues to be resolved before lifeguard services can be resumed, including assessing newly formed sand banks, accelerated erosion along the shoreline and a safety evaluation of the swimmable area. Please check the Rouge Beach Improvements Project page for the most up-to-date information.

For more information about swimming safety in Rouge National Urban Park, please visit Water safety page.

Paddling 

Rouge National Urban Park is beautiful from the water. Canoe, kayak or paddleboard down the Rouge River or around the tranquil Rouge Marsh and observe the rich diversity of birds that call this area home. Rouge Marsh is the largest and best remaining wetland in the City of Toronto.

A popular route is to paddle down the Rouge River south from Glen Rouge Campground to Rouge Marsh, which takes about 1 hour and passes through some of the park’s most stunning wetlands. Rouge Marsh is large, be sure to keep your point of entry in mind.

For more information about paddling safety in Rouge National Urban Park, please visit Water safety page.

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