Supplementary Information


Raison d’être

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change is responsible for the Parks Canada Agency. Parks Canada protects and presents nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and fosters public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations. Canada’s national urban park, national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas, of which Parks Canada is the proud steward, offer Canadians opportunities to visit, experience and personally connect with Canada’s rich natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them. In carrying out its responsibilities, Parks Canada works in collaboration with the public, other federal departments, provinces, territories, Indigenous peoples and stakeholders.


Mandate and role

On behalf of the people of Canada, we protect and present nationally significant examples of Canada’s natural and cultural heritage, and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.

For more information on the Agency’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.


Operating context
An overview of Parks Canada’s network
  • 47 national parks
  • 5 national marine conservation areas
  • 1 national urban park
  • 171 national historic sites
  • 7 townsite communities in national parks

Parks Canada has operations across Canada. With responsibility for the management and administration of 47 national parks, Rouge National Urban Park, five national marine conservation areas and 171 national historic sites, including nine historic canals, Parks Canada employees and resources are active in hundreds of communities and remote locations from coast to coast to coast.

National parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas represent the very best of Canada, including the history, culture and living legacy of Indigenous peoples. The Government of Canada is committed to achieving reconciliation with Indigenous peoples through a renewed, nation-to-nation, Inuit-Crown and government-to-government relationship based on recognition of rights, respect, cooperation and partnership. Parks Canada demonstrates leadership both nationally and internationally in its relations with Indigenous partners, working with hundreds of Indigenous communities across the country in the management of Parks Canada’s heritage places. There are currently over 30 formal collaborative arrangements between Parks Canada and Indigenous partners. Of those places, 19 have cooperative management structures where Indigenous peoples influence decision-making. The Agency is committed to reconciliation and will continue to engage and consult with Indigenous partners to ensure a greater number of places have arrangements where Indigenous partners have a decision-making role in the management of heritage places.

A Nature Legacy for Canada

In Budget 2018, the Government of Canada made an historic investment of $1.3 billion in nature conservation, known as A Nature Legacy for Canada.

Through this significant investment Parks Canada received $221 million over 5 years to support the implementation of Nature Legacy. Allocated funds are being used to accelerate the modernization of Parks Canada’s approach to conservation.

Environmental forces

Parks Canada’s heritage places may be vulnerable to environmental forces including changes to:

  • climate (e.g., increasing temperatures, changing precipitations, extreme weather events)
  • physical environment (e.g., air quality, water quality, ocean acidification, sea level rise, glacier retreat, habitat loss and fragmentation)
  • biodiversity (e.g., ecosystem processes, increased number of species at risk, hyper abundant species and invasive species)
Using technology to improve visitor services

Parks Canada uses technology in a variety of ways to improve visitor services:

  • reaching Canadians where they live and work through digital channels (web, YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter);
  • ensuring digital services for trip planning, purchasing admission and reserving accommodation; and,
  • influencing visitation patterns: sharing visitor safety information and trail maps, promoting Canada’s heritage and conservation at the right time and with the right message.

The support and collaboration of Indigenous governments, organizations and communities, as well as provincial and territorial governments, are essential to Parks Canada’s ability to establish or expand national parks and national marine conservation areas. The requirement to balance protection and ecologically sustainable use of national marine conservation areas involves a much broader stakeholder perspective to consider. Bringing all of these elements together and moving forward in a harmonious and positive way requires time and respectful discourse.

Climate change and other environmental forces challenge the integrity of ecosystems and the condition of Parks Canada’s cultural resources and contemporary infrastructure. Shoreline erosion at national historic sites, the arrival of invasive species at national parks, impacts on biodiversity and the shrinking populations of species unable to adapt to variations in the ecosystems are a few examples of the effects of climate change. The increasing severity and frequency of disturbances such as storms, floods and avalanches also impact Parks Canada infrastructure, such as highways and bridges.

Parks Canada must protect its natural and cultural heritage places while encouraging visitation to ensure that these special places remain relevant in the hearts and minds of Canadians. As a world leader in conservation and in preserving the ecological integrity and cultural resources of its places for future generations, Parks Canada works to better manage visitation at locations that experience higher visitation rates, while continuing to ensure high quality visitor experiences. To lessen impact, Parks Canada encourages visitors to seek out lesser-known parks and historic sites, enjoy little known hidden gems and explore shoulder season experiences in spring and fall.

Tourism is an important economic generator for Canada. Parks Canada is the guardian of some of Canada’s most iconic natural and cultural treasures and contributes to the country’s world-class tourism offer. With Indigenous partners, the Agency offers authentic Indigenous tourism experiences which enable visitors to gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the cultural connection Indigenous peoples have to these places.

Since 2012, visitation to Parks Canada places has rebounded following a decade of decline. Leading up to and during this period of growth, the Agency made a significant investment to attract larger and more diverse audiences. With free admission offered during the Canada 150 celebrations, visitation reached a record high in 2017–18 with 27.2 million visitors. As a result visitation continues to increase compared to its baseline level of 24.7 million visitors in 2016–17 having reached 25.1 million visitors in 2018–19. Since 2017, marketing and outreach initiatives have been leveraged through a variety of communication channels, including a hidden gems campaign, to influence visitation patterns, to promote less-frequented destinations and to help better distribute visitation across the Parks Canada network.

There are seven townsite communities in national parks, all located in western Canada. These townsites represent unique opportunities to demonstrate the overriding values of ecological integrity, environmental citizenship and sustainable development. They provide visitors with opportunities to learn and develop personal connections to natural and cultural heritage from the comfort of a community, and provide a launching pad for deeper ventures into national parks. They support ecological integrity by consolidating use and development to relatively small areas. National park townsite communities manage development in accordance with community plans and legislation; respecting their cultural and historical aspects and the ecological integrity of the surrounding park. In Banff and Jasper, commercial development limits are also used to manage growth along with eligible residency and fixed boundaries.

Canada’s population is evolving. It is expected to become more culturally diverse over the next two decades as Canada continues to rely increasingly on immigration to support population growth and to offset natural declines.

Demographic shifts

Demographic shifts have generated new audiences that require placing greater emphasis on:

  • reaching Canadians where they live and work;
  • integrating diverse cultures and histories into historical content; and,
  • ensuring the Parks Canada service offer is inclusive and accessible for all Canadians.

With demographic changes and the rise of digital communications, the ways in which we tell stories and absorb information are being transformed. In the coming years, Parks Canada’s service offer will continue to be influenced by an increasingly diverse population with varying needs and interests. As well, new national accessibility legislation, which aims to promote equality and participation for people of varying abilities, will also influence Parks Canada’s programs and services.

As the federal lead for cultural heritage places conservation, Parks Canada administers federal heritage designation and built heritage conservation programs on behalf of the Government of Canada. Federal custodian departments, Crown corporations, provinces and territories, Indigenous peoples, and the broader heritage community play a major role in preserving Canada’s heritage places. The protection of cultural heritage places by the federal government is a complex endeavour that requires a coherent and robust system for the identification and conservation of Canada’s nationally significant heritage places.

Both the November 2018 Auditor General’s report and the Standing Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development’s December 2017 report highlighted the need to better protect federal heritage properties and to strengthen heritage conservation and protection across Canada. The recommendations include the integration of Indigenous perspectives, better policy and legislative measures, and financial incentives. Parks Canada is working towards addressing the findings from these reports.

Tracking the portfolio of built assets
  • Parks Canada continues to make progress on improving its infrastructure. In 2019, its annual Asset Report Card indicated that by current replacement value 61% of the Agency’s built assets are in good to fair condition, compared to 60% the previous year.
  • Annual variations in the total built asset inventory are influenced by factors such as the establishment of new parks and sites (e.g., Rouge National Urban Park resulted in the addition of 375 assets)

Parks Canada manages a complex portfolio of assets valued at approximately $25.8 billion. Highways maintained by Parks Canada serve as critical socio-economic corridors enabling the flow of people and commercial goods. Along with heritage canals, highways additionally serve as vital links connecting Canadian communities. Ensuring the long-term sustainability of Parks Canada’s asset portfolio is essential to the delivery of the Agency’s mandate and to ensure that Parks Canada can meet its custodial responsibilities on behalf of the Government of Canada. Further to this, the November 2018 report by the Auditor General cited the need for Parks Canada to do more to conserve the physical condition and heritage value of federal heritage properties. The lack of sufficient ongoing funding to maintain its built heritage assets puts the Agency at risk of not being able to deliver its mandate and of losing significant and irreplaceable examples of Canada’s cultural and built heritage.

Parks Canada’s commitment to address government priorities for ensuring the accessibility and inclusiveness of its places for visitors, and for supporting the resiliency of its asset portfolio against the effects of climate change, places additional strain on existing resources and the Agency’s capacity to deliver and evolve Parks Canada’s programs and services. Efforts to make a long-term business case for on-going funding remain a central priority for the Agency.


Supplementary Information Tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Due to the changes to the Federal Sustainability Act, the Agency's 2020-21 report on its progress toward meeting the commitments in its 2020 to 23 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy is tabled separately from the Departmental Results Report and can be found here.


Details on transfer payment programs


General Class Contribution Program

Start date

1995–96


End date

Ongoing


Type of transfer payment

Contribution


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through Estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2017–18


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations

Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations

People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Establishment

Program: Heritage Places Conservation

Program: Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support

Program: Visitor Experience

Program: Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsite Management


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The objective of the program is to assist recipients in conducting activities and delivering projects that will support the Agency in fulfilling its mandate to preserve and protect nationally significant examples of Canada's natural and cultural heritage and present and foster public understanding, appreciation and enjoyment in ways that ensure the ecological and commemorative integrity of these places for present and future generations.


Results achieved

Projects under the General Class Contribution Program achieved one or more of the following results:

  • Canadians recognize, appreciate and are engaged in the values of natural and cultural conservation;
  • Stakeholders are engaged in terms of interest and involvement of common objectives towards ecological or cultural integrity; and,
  • Parks Canada managers, partners and stakeholders have access to a better knowledge base for informed decision-making and dialogue on commercial, ecological or indigenous issues of mutual interest.

Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

The program is currently undergoing an evaluation which is expected to be completed by April 2022.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 13,109,395 16,939,187 15,835,443 15,364,410 15,364,410 -471,033
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 13,109,395 16,939,187 15,835,443 15,364,410 15,364,410 -471,033
Explanation of variances The variance in actual spending is the result of lower spending due to Covid-19 complications with recipients.

Support to The Great Trail

Start date

2018–19


End date

2021–22


Type of transfer payment

Contribution


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2018–19


Link to departmental result(s)

People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Visitor Experience


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The contribution is to enhance, maintain and improve the Great Trail, a national network of multi-use recreational trails that links 15,000 communities and spans 24,400 kilometers. The emphasis is on optimizing user experience and accessibility, and ensuring long-term sustainability.


Results achieved

  • The Great Trail is safe and accessible for trail users;
  • The Great Trail is enhanced through linkages with Indigenous communities and other trail networks; and,
  • Canadians are aware of The Great Trail and are inspired to discover their natural heritage.

Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

The program is currently undergoing an evaluation which is expected to be completed by April 2022.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 7,500,000 0

Implementation of Rights and Reconciliation Agreements in Atlantic Canada

Start date

2019-20


End date

Ongoing


Type of transfer payment

Grant


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations

Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations

People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Conservation


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The objectives of these grants are:

  • to support the Rights and Reconciliation Agreements signed by Parks Canada and the Indigenous Nations included in the Historic Peace and Friendship Treaties in Atlantic Canada (the Mi’kmaq, Maliseet and Peskotomuhkati Nations);
  • build capacity in Indigenous communities to participate with Parks Canada as co-managers of National Parks and National Historic Sites;
  • foster re-connection with the lands through traditional stewardship practices; and,
  • protect Mi’kmaq, Maliseet and Peskotomuhkati culture and heritage.

Results achieved

Not available, as funds have not been disbursed. Grants will be provided after Rights and Reconciliation Agreements were signed. These agreements are not finalized.


Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 4,094,700 0 0 -4,094,700
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 4,094,700 0 0 -4,094,700
Explanation of variances Grants will be provided after Rights and Reconciliation Agreements are signed. These agreements have not been finalized.

Inuit Research Fund

Start date

2020-21


End date

2025-26


Type of transfer payment

Grant


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations

People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Establishment


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of this grant is to fulfill a commitment made in the Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA) regarding benefits and economic opportunities stemming from the establishment, development and operation of the Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area. The objective is to provide for Inuit led research and monitoring in Tallurutiup Imanga, and to support the development of an Inuit Research and Monitoring Plan.


Results achieved

The Inuit Research Fund will develop research capacity for Inuit to ensure that they will be able to identify and conduct research according to their own priorities. Inuit research and priorities will then be valued equally as Western science in research and monitoring for Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area.


Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 0
Total contributions 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 0 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 0

International Peace Garden

Start date

1996-97


End date

Ongoing


Type of transfer payment

Contribution


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-12


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Conservation


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of this grant is to support the International Peace Garden, a memorial to the peace that has existed between the United States and Canada, located in Manitoba and North Dakota. The objective of the grant is to help defray the costs of operating the International Peace Garden.


Results achieved

Canada’s continued symbolic support for the Garden is demonstrated


Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 27,000 0

National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places

Start date

2008-09


End date

Ongoing


Type of transfer payment

Contribution


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-17


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s cultural heritage is protected for present and future generations


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Conservation


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The Program assists recipients in conducting activities aimed at ensuring the heritage value of non-federally owned or administered heritage places that have been formally recognized by the Government of Canada. It provides financial contributions to eligible recipients to share the costs of work necessary to ensure the physical health of a heritage place and to ensure Canadians understand the importance of the site and its role in the history of Canada.


Results achieved

Cultural resources of national significance at heritage places recognized by the Government of Canada are maintained or improved.


Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 2,456,112 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 967,759 -32,241
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 2,456,112 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 967,759 -32,241

Tallurutiup Imanga Inuit Stewardship Program Seed Fund

Start date

2019-20


End date

2025-26


Type of transfer payment

Grant


Type of appropriation

Appropriated annually through estimates


Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2019-20


Link to departmental result(s)

Canada’s natural heritage is protected for present and future generations

People connect to and experience Canada’s natural and cultural heritage in ways that are meaningful to them


Link to the department’s Program Inventory

Program: Heritage Places Establishment


Purpose and objectives of transfer payment program

The purpose of this grant is to fulfill a commitment made in the Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement (IIBA) regarding benefits and economic opportunities stemming from the establishment, development and operation of the Tallurutiup Imanga National Marine Conservation Area (TINMCA). The objective is to cover the start-up cost of an Inuit Stewardship program in the five communities associated with TINMCA. The program will support stewardship activities of Inuit within Tallurutiup Imanga that will make valuable contributions to the promotion of Inuit culture, well-being, the transmission of knowledge to youth, and the delivery of Inuit cultural, social, economic, health and conservation benefits.


Results achieved

The Stewardship Program will support Inuit involvement in conservation economy and collaborative management of Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage.


Findings of audits completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Findings of evaluations completed in 2020-21

Not applicable.


Engagement of applicants and recipients in 2020-21

Not applicable.

Financial information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2018–19 Actual spending 2019–20 Actual spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2020–21 Total authorities available for use 2020–21 Actual spending (authorities used) Variance (2020–21 actual minus 2020–21 planned)
Total grants 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total contributions 0 2,927,088 2,400,000 2,400,000 2,400,000 0
Total other types of transfer payments 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total program 0 2,927,088 2,400,000 2,400,000 2,400,000 0

Gender-based analysis plus


Institutional GBA+ capacity

In 2020-21, the Parks Canada Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) team continued the implementation of its GBA+ Action Plan, supported by a senior management representative and a network of employees from six directorates. The GBA+ team was composed of one dedicated FTE and students. They provided guidance and support to various functional teams for required GBA+ analysis in Memoranda to Cabinet, budget proposals and Treasury Board submissions, as well as for other initiatives, such as initial discussions on how to apply GBA+ to the uniform program. To support functional teams in this work as well as build ongoing organizational capacity, the GBA+ team created a Parks Canada GBA+ template containing references to intersectionality and a “how to do a GBA+” reference tool.

Additionally, the GBA+ team provided recommendations to Management Planning, Policy and Operations on how to integrate GBA+ in management planning, a legislative and policy requirement that provide strategic guidance for 10 years to managers of heritage places administered by Parks Canada such as national parks or national historic sites. For example, GBA+ can be incorporated into all stages of planning, but is best suited during “scoping”, “consultation” and “drafting of the management plan” stages.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, a planned Learn-to Camp evaluation with a GBA+ lens by the Office of Internal Audit and Evaluation (OIAE) was postponed and is currently scheduled to begin in 2024-25. A GBA+ lens is being applied, where appropriate, to all ongoing evaluations conducted by OIAE, though evaluators have noted challenges in obtaining disaggregated data.

The GBA+ team also focused on increasing GBA+ awareness within Parks Canada with the following:

  • Presentations on GBA+ to various organizational units within Parks Canada explaining notions such as the difference between sex and gender, intersectionality and unconscious bias;
  • Presentations titled Gender-Friendly Toolkit explaining the difference between sex and gender, and inclusive language with respect to sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression and sex characteristics;
  • Presentation about the policy direction to modernize the Government of Canada’s sex and gender information practices;
  • Participation in the government-wide GBA+ Awareness Week Nov 2-6, 2020;
  • Participation on the Parks Canada panel during International Women’s Day on March 8, 2021;
  • Creation and launch of the second edition of the Parks Canada Guide to Trans-Inclusive Workplaces during Transgender Awareness Week (Nov 8-14, 2020);
  • Message on the May 17, 2020 International Day against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia;
  • Participation in the Public Service Pride Week (Aug 24-28, 2020); and,
  • Membership with Pride at Work Canada as of October 1, 2020.

Gender and diversity Impacts, by program

Core Responsibility

Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage


Program

  • Heritage Places
  • Establishment
  • Heritage Places Conservation
  • Heritage Places Promotion and Public Support
  • Visitor Experience
  • Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Management

Target Population

All Canadians


Distribution of Benefits

Unable to complete, lack of data available.


GBA+ Data Collection Plan

Nothing to report for 2020-21.


Program links to Gender Results Framework

 Education and Skills Development Economic Participation and Prosperity Leadership and Democratic Participation Gender-based Violence and Access to Justice Poverty Reduction, Health and Well-Being Gender Equality around the World
Core Responsibility: Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage
Parks Canada’s five programs have links to the Gender Results Framework (GRF) although it is not possible at the moment to clearly identify which ones. A renewal of the Parks Canada Agency Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory will make it possible to better identify the program links to the GRF.
Heritage Places Establishmentnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Places Conservationnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Places Promotion and Public Supportnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Visitor Experiencenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Managementnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available

Program links to Quality of Life Framework

  Prosperity Health Environment Society Good Governance
Core Responsibility: Protecting and Presenting Canada’s Natural and Cultural Heritage
Parks Canada’s five programs have links to the Quality of Life Framework (QLF) although it is not possible at the moment to clearly identify which ones. A renewal of the Parks Canada Agency Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory will make it possible to better identify the program links to the QLF.
Heritage Places Establishmentnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Places Conservationnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Places Promotion and Public Supportnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Visitor Experiencenot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available
Heritage Canals, Highways and Townsites Managementnot availablenot availablenot availablenot availablenot available

Definitions



Gender Scale

  • First group: Predominantly men (e.g. 80 per cent or more men)
  • Second group: 60 per cent - 79 per cent men
  • Third group: Broadly gender-balanced
  • Forth group: 60 per cent - 79 per cent women
  • Fifth group: Predominantly women (e.g. 80 per cent or more women)

Income Level Scale

  • First group: Strongly benefits low income individuals (Strongly progressive)
  • Second group: Somewhat benefits low income individuals (Somewhat progressive)
  • Third group: No significant distributional impacts
  • Forth group: Somewhat benefits high income individuals (Somewhat regressive)
  • Fifth group: Strongly benefits high income individuals (Strongly regressive)

Age Group Scale

  • First group: Primarily benefits youth, children and/or future generations
  • Second group: No significant inter-generational impacts or impacts generation between youth and seniors
  • Third group: Primarily benefits seniors or the baby boom generation

Gender Results Framework Pillars

See definitions at the following page: https://women-gender-equality.canada.ca/en/gender-results-framework.htmlGender Results Framework - Women and Gender Equality Canada


Quality of Life Domains


Response to parliamentary committees and external audits


Response to audits conducted by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (including audits conducted by the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)


The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development to the Parliament of Canada undertook a review focused on whether federal departments and agencies contributed to the goal of safe and healthy communities in the 2016–2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy. The review examined the 2017–2020 departmental sustainable development strategies of 12 federal departments and agencies, including Parks Canada, that contribute to the goal of safe and healthy communities as well as the progress these organizations reported in the supplementary tables of their 2018–19 departmental results reports on the federal goal of safe and healthy communities.

The review found that no departments or agencies explicitly stated under the goal of safe and healthy communities in their sustainable development strategies how they would address 3 of the 10 contributing actions related to outdoor air quality.

Parks Canada responded that although the Agency is not a contributor to these actions related to outdoor air quality, the Agency would continue to ensure that its departmental sustainable development strategy links to the areas of contributing actions in the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy that the Agency’s mandate supports. There were no other recommendations related to Parks Canada.

Date modified :